Appendix A: ITPilot Operators

This appendix describes the operators provided by ITPilot to create expressions used in the Condition, Expression and Record Constructor components.

Logical Operators

Logical operators are used to create Boolean expressions (which are evaluated as true or false). The logical operators supported are:

  • AND: Is the logical “and”. Evaluates two conditions and returns a true value only if both are correct.
  • OR: Is the logical “or”. Evaluates two conditions and returns a true value, if one of the two is correct.
  • NOT: Is the logical negation. It is applied to a condition and negates its value.

Comparison Operators

An operator of this type returns the logical value true or false according to the evaluation result of two operands. Depending on the nature of the operator the operands should be of a specific data type. When the right operand of an operator is an array of elements, this must be introduced with the following format: [value1, value2, ...., valueN].

The comparison operators are the following:

  • <: Receives two operands that can be of the types: int, long, float, double or date. Evaluated as true if the first operand is less than the second.

  • <=: Applied to two operands of the same type as in the operator < and is evaluated as true if the first operand is less than or equal to the second.

  • >: Receives two operands that can be of the types: int, long, float, double, or date. Checks if the first operand is greater than the second.

  • >=: Applied to two operands of the same types as the operator > and is evaluated as true if the first operand is greater than or equal to the second.

  • =: Receives two operands that can be of the types: int, long, float, double, boolean, string, url, page, list, record and date. Evaluates the equality of the two operands.

  • <>: Applied to two operands of the same types as the operator = and is evaluated as true if the first operand is not equal to the second.

  • like: Accepts one string-type element and one SQL LIKE expression as operands. It checks if the character string matches the expression received. The expression must follow standard SQL format for the expressions used with the SQL like operator:

    • The character % represents a segment of any length within a character string.
    • The character _ represents a string of length 1.

    For example, the expression %commerce_ matches any string ending with the substring commerce followed by any character. If the characters % or _ are included as part of a constant substring, they must be escaped by prefixing them with the character $. If the escape character is included, it must be escaped as well (e.g. $$).

  • regexp_like: Applied to two operands, a string-type parameter and a regular expression (Java Regular Expressions). It checks if the string-type parameter matches the regular expression.

    If you want to ignore the case differences, you should use the operator regexp_ilike because the performance will be better than if you use a regular expression that ignores the case (with ?i).

  • regexp_ilike: Applied to two operands, a string-type parameter and a Java regular expression. It checks if the string-type parameter matches the regular expression, ignoring case differences. You can achieve the same result with the operator regexp_like, but the performance will be worse.

  • contains: Accepts one string-type element and one array of string-type elements as operands. Returns true if the string provided as first operand contains all the substrings provided in the array on the second operand. Returns false otherwise.

    Example: Book.title contains [’java’,’xml’]

  • containsor: Accepts one string-type element and one array of string-type elements as operands. Returns true if the string provided as first operand contains any of the substrings provided in the array on the second operand. Returns false otherwise.

  • in: Applied to two operands. First operand is an element that can belong to the following data types: int, long, float, double, string, date or url. Second operand is an array of elements of the same type than the first operand. Returns true if the first operand is included in the array of elements provided on the second operand.

    Example: Book.isbn in [’ 9780782141313’,’ 9780470464892’]

  • between: Applied to two operands. First operand is an element that can belong to the following data types: int, long, float, double, string, date or url. Second operand is an array of two elements of the same type than the first operand. Returns true if the operand on the left side is in the range specified by the two elements in the array, including the limit values.

    Example: Book.price between [10,20]