Examples

The following scenario provides an example of why it is important to enable the uniqueness detection feature:

  1. Uniqueness detection is enabled.
  2. John works on the database DB1 and Scott on the database DB2.
    1. Both databases are linked to the same database in the VCS repository.
    2. Both databases are currently in the same state and contain the following elements:
      1. A folder named F1.
      2. A folder named F2.
      3. A data source named DS1 located inside F1.
      4. A view named V1 also located inside F1.
    3. All the elements are up-to-date and without local modifications.
  3. John moves V1 to F2 and checks in the changes.
  4. Scott modifies V1 and checks in the changes.
    1. Virtual DataPort detects a uniqueness conflict between the different versions of V1: one located in F1 with local changes and the remote version which is currently located in F2.
    2. Scott forces the check-in, so V1 is now located in F1 again and contains its own changes.
  5. John modifies V1, which in his database - DB1 - still is in the folder F2, and checks out the database.
    1. Virtual DataPort detects a uniqueness conflict between the different versions of V1: one located in F2 with local changes and the remote version which is currently located in F1.
    2. John forces the check-out, so V1 is now located in F1 and contains the changes corresponding to Scott’s previous check-in (John agreed to lose his local changes after forcing the check-out).

Note

In step 3, Virtual DataPort detects a movement and requires John to confirm the check-in, even if this movement is safe. Currently, this is a known limitation of the uniqueness detection feature: all movements of elements require explicit confirmation when checking in the changes.